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At 9:34am on October 17, 2011, Sheepfreak said…
Thank you for your kinds words.  Knit on! J
At 5:09pm on December 31, 2010, Kate Moynahan said…

Thank you.  I'm glad to hear from another self taught knitter.  This site has been a great support to me in the last year or so.  I look forward to hearing about your projects.  Have a happy and healthy new year.

Kate M.

At 2:40pm on December 30, 2010, OliverBoliver said…
Thanks Terri! Glad you like it. Hope you have a great new year!

Pen x
At 11:38am on December 26, 2010, cherylbwaters said…
Terri, I plan to have a wonderful New Year. I hope you have the same.
At 8:42am on December 26, 2010, Janice Aitkens said…

Thank You Terri & your more than welcome for the cards

Hugs Janice

At 6:35am on December 26, 2010, norma said…

 Hi Terri, I hope you have a really good New Year,,

 your work is lovely.,, keep on knitting

                                           --norma--

At 10:07am on August 24, 2010, Sage Gypsy said…
I did see it. Pretty yarn! :)
At 9:45am on August 23, 2010, Sage Gypsy said…
I'm sorry I didn't make that very clear. I actually do a dec rnd every 10 rows, so the dc rnd is row 10, or 20, or 30, and the 9 rows in-between are plain stockinette. Of course, you can change all of this - you can rib 40 rows for a long, fold-over cuff, for instance. I started doing it all by row count, and on an even 10 rows, because it makes is so EASY to count, which means I can do it while watching suspenseful movies, or answering questions, or other things that make it hard to concentrate. Good luck! :)
At 9:43am on August 23, 2010, Sage Gypsy said…
Hi! :) If she only wants ankle-length socks, maybe you should skip the plain stockinette altogether... especially since you said your first sock came out a little loose on your gauge. When I am using size 0 dpn and very fine sock yarn, I might put 20 rows of length on an ankle sock... Anyway, I suggest you try doing your 20 rows of ribbing then 9 rows of stockinette, then dec 2 in the same rnd, just as you say, one at the end of the 1st dpn and one at the beg of the 3rd dpn.
At 7:00am on August 23, 2010, Janice Aitkens said…
Thank You Terri
I do a very basic one & let the yarn create the pattern well it the cheat ways lol
Hugs Janice
At 5:18pm on August 22, 2010, Terri A said…
Finally got the pictures of the socks uploaded. I've worked on the blue socks all day today and that's as far as I've gotten. It's a wonder they look like anything b/c I took the advice of three different people. haha-call me hairbrained!
At 11:49am on August 21, 2010, cherylbwaters said…
Hey, a sock is a sock. We all have to start somewhere. Can't wait to see a photo. Congratulations on your accomplishment.
At 9:42am on August 19, 2010, cherylbwaters said…
Terri, I don't use Ravelry a whole lot but I do suggest you join. Basically the feature I use is for looking at patterns. It really is a great resource for that alone. Many people use it as an online journal. I figure I'm on the KP community enough that if I got involved over in Ravelry, I'd never have any knitting or spinning time. Because the KP community is smaller than Ravelry, I find it friendlier here. That's not to say there aren't friendly people on Ravelry. I just find that those who are active in the community here to be more friendly. I've always felt overwhelmed in Ravelry because it is so big.
At 9:19am on August 19, 2010, Sage Gypsy said…
I forgot to say - Stephanie McPhee writes comedy! She actually has a lot of really helpful information, tips and charts and stuff that make a good pocket reference, but I don't think you'd call it a novel. Her books are humor for knitters...
At 9:09am on August 19, 2010, Sage Gypsy said…
I have a wonderful sister like that - no matter how weird something comes out, she loves it and wears it anyway! There have been some socks that only worked as slippers or for sleeping in, sweaters that just didn't quite come out right... She loves even the stuff I've been ready to throw out and give up on. With that kind of support, is it any wonder I keep trying? :) And over the years, I've gotten a lot better, and some of the stuff I make for her has turned out terrific...
At 1:00pm on August 18, 2010, Sage Gypsy said…
I love the green scarf, and the brown beanie! :)
At 12:55pm on August 18, 2010, Sage Gypsy said…
This seems to fit most of them. There is one friend who is very obese and I start w/ 20-40-20 for him, and don't make the socks very long. My brother has enormous calves, so I devised a system of enlarging just the calf for him. I can make the notes on the rows for leg and foot right on the foot tracing I have, or sometimes I keep the yarn label, when I get a "PERFECT!" report on the fit. I always do my shaping on an even 10 rows, whether it's 20 or 100, just to make life easier on my brain, or on an even multiple of 5 rows, for the length of the foot.
Since I started tapering the lower leg this way, the socks stay up a lot better... especially if you switch to a yarn with elastic in it, for one of those 10-row stripes - I put them either right below the ribbing, or right above the heel. They seem to fit especially well if you have the bit of elastic at the ankle...
I hope this makes a little bit of sense - it's actually much easier to SEE on a sock, than to write it out.
At 12:55pm on August 18, 2010, Sage Gypsy said…
On the 20th (or 100th, or whatever) row, I will dec 2 sts - one at each SIDE of the sock, and I alternate, so the first dec rnd, I always dec. on the back of the side - at the end of the 1st dpn, and the beg of the 3rd dpn. I k 10 rows st, on the 10th row I dec 2 sts, one on either end of the 2nd needle, so at the front edge of the sides. I repeat that - 10 more rows, dec'ing 2 sts from ea. short needle, then 10 more rows, and dec ea. end of the long needle - so, over 40 rows of st st, I have dec'd to 15, 30, 15 at the bottom of the leg/ top of the heel. I k across the 1st dpn, turn, and sl, p, sl, p across dpn 1 and dpn 3 for the heel, turn, sl, k, sl, k across, etc., until the heel flap is 20 or 25 rows (counted at the side, since every other row is slipped, it's actually 40 or 50 rows, creating a very sturdy fabric over the heel) - again, depending on how big or little the feet. Most of my family has very long, skinny feet, and I usually make 25-row heels - and make a little note on the yarn label, esp. if I've done anything diff. I k the heel cup - any way you like, really - and dec as usual until I have 15, 30, 15 again, on the instep of the foot.
I k again, and note the rows on the label, so I don't have to go back and re-count to make the second sock match. For instance, (I told you my family has big feet) most of the men in my family get 75 rows stockinette after the last dec row, for a small woman's foot, I might do 60 rows. I can lay the sock on my tracing of their foot; allow about 1.5" for the toe dec. Usually it fits better a bit short, than a bit long. Again, on the 60th or 75th row, I beg the toe dec, and dec 4 sts every rnd until I have 4, 8, 4, k across the 1st dpn to the side seam, then I turn it inside out and do a 3-needle bind off.
At 12:53pm on August 18, 2010, Sage Gypsy said…
I always do it the same way, and that way I never forget how I did it. I use sock wt yarn, and size 0 - 3 dpn - honestly, it depends more on which dpn are empty, than anything else. I co 17, 34, 17 - the join becomes ctr back of the sock. I single rib 20 rows, then stockinette from 20 - 100 rows, depending on things like how much yarn I have, and who the socks are for (I like LONG socks, some others like ankle-high socks...) I note how many rows of straight stockinette I did, on the yarn label, so I don't have to re-count or remember.
At 12:52pm on August 18, 2010, Sage Gypsy said…
Hi! You probably do need a smaller needle. Also, you could try using a wool yarn that might shrink a bit...

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